Zevallos palace and Saint Ursula martir by Caravaggio | Naples

Visit Saint Ursula martir by Caravaggio | Naples Zevallos Palace

In his last painting “martyr of Saint Ursula“, Caravaggio adopts a new iconography to represent Saint Ursula. Infact she has generally depicted together with some virgins and other symbols of martyr.
While Caravaggio paints Saint Ursula pierced by an arrow lauched by the hand of Attila her refuse who didn’t want to accept.
This dramatic scene takes place in the tent of Attila. We can easily understand thanks to the red drapery in the background, all the the environment characterised by a sophisticated mix of lihgts and shadows.
This atmosphere point out the hard times he was going trough at the end of his life.
It didn’t take long time for Caravaggio to paint this artwork since he was in the hurry to leave for Porto Ercole where he would probably obtain the grace. He died miserably during that trip. The hurry didn’t allow the canvas to dry properly and it was exposed to the sun for mistake.

The composition

On the left, the first character we notice is Attila, dressed up in seventeenth century clothes; who has just launched the arrow against St Ursula. On is face is clear an expression of remorse for what he has just done. On the right there is St Ursula with arrow that has just hurt her chest. She has her head bent towards her chest to see what has just happened she look has nothing had appened but her face and her hands are pale compared to the other characters in the painting, because of her imminent death.
Behind the main scene, three barbarians wearing modern clothes ( one of them is wearing an armor made of iron ), are rushing to help Saint Ursula, incredulous to what their commander has just done. The barbarian behind St Ursula looks like Caravaggio who shows a painful expression and has got his mouth open. It seems that he is suffering with her.

Palazzo Zevallos, also known as Palazzo Colonna di Stigliano, is one of the historical-monumental buildings and apartments in Naples that is home and tells a part of the history of the people of Naples. Palazzo Zevallos was born as noble apartment built by Giovanni Zevallos, Duke of Ostuni. Handed down as a legacy for two generations, the Palace and his family moved to apartments Colonna di Stigliano following the marriage between her daughter Giovanna and Prince of Sonnino, Julian’s column, which thus became also Prince of Stigliano. The unit of palazzo Zevallos was undermined by internal strife to the family that he earned selling the first and third floors in different families. From 1898 Palazzo Zevallos is owned by Banca Commerciale Italiana, together with the restructuring of the building to be used as functional uses, I put together all the apartments by purchasing the properties belonging to the family of the Forques and subsequently the remaining apartments in the building and the shops below. The façade in the Baroque style, it remains unchanged the portal created with marble panels and piperno, escaped the nineteenth-century changes that affected the Palace and its floor plan. Newly renovated and even inside, the patrician Palace Zevallos Stigliano features an Art Gallery open to the public several rooms in which are exhibited paintings and sculptures from the seventeenth to the nineteenth century Neapolitan and charcoal drawings of the 9th and 20th century.

Palazzo_Zevallos_Colonna_di_Stigliano of considerable charm, in addition to the art collection in the possession of the BCI, is the very structure of the building, its interior impressive: marble-clad walls, stained glass Windows, and its decoration, the great Hall for the public. Of considerable charm, in addition to the art collection in the possession of the BCI, is the very structure of the building, its interior impressive: marble-clad walls, stained glass Windows, and its decoration, the great Hall for the public. Of considerable charm, in addition to the art collection in the possession of the BCI, is the very structure of the building, its interior impressive: marble-clad walls, stained glass Windows, skylight and its decorations, the great Hall for the public.

Palazzo Zevallos tells and witness to the art and history of the Neapolitan nobility.

INFORMATIONS

Opening time:
- Monday closed;
- From Tuesday to Friday from 10:00 to 18:00;
- Saturday and Sunday from 10:00 to 20:00

Ticket:
- Adults € 5.00
- Reduced € 3.00
Young people from 18 to 25 years old; Intesa Sanpaolo customers; over 65; Groups of at least 15 people 

FREE ENTRY every first Sunday of the month.

Address:
Via Toledo, 185 - Naples